Categories
climbing

Climbing With Your Camera: Dos & Don’ts

Climb Away‘s vision is to bring people from all over the world together over the love of climbing. Get the organization’s pro tips on climbing photography here.

Rock walls are vast and full of opportunities for lessons and growth. Climb Away, a Canadian organization that employs a variety of outdoor instructors as guides for retreats, facilitates that. And one of the most important topics they cover is how to get beginners comfortable on the wall.

In this article, Alex Eggermont, a Squamish-based photographer and instructor at Climb Away, helps us break down the basics of climbing photography.

Climbing With a Camera
Photo credit: Alex Eggermont

Climbing With Your Camera: Dos

Climbing with your camera can be a safety hazard for you and those climbing around you, especially with all the gear that goes along with it. Before going outdoors with professional camera equipment, it’s important to know what the best practices are.

Here’s how to ensure staying light, safe, and agile, while getting the shots you’re searching for.

1. Know what you’re shooting

Ideally, you’ve climbed the route, or at least know when and where the hard parts are. To avoid disturbing the climber during these crux moments, go to the crag a few times and practice those moves with your climbing partner. Make sure you can climb it smoothly before taking it on as a photographer.

2. Take only one or two lenses

Ideally, you wouldn’t even have to change lenses on the wall and even have two bodies. You’re already hauling lots with you while you’re climbing, so only take the essential camera equipment. Remember to stay light.

3. Use static ropes

Redirect whenever you can so that you can see your anchor point and avoid sharp edges that could lead to core shots way faster than you think. Static will give you more control while climbing and help you be more intentional with directing your angles.

4. New point of view

Find that viewpoint you haven’t seen before. The beauty of photographing climbers is that there are so many movements you can capture. Take on a fresh, new perspective, something that’s special to the climber and their style. Try to be original and create some unique content!

climbing with your camera climber
Photo credit: Mark Doliner

5. Add some flexibility

Having two ropes attached to different anchors and two GRIGRIs is a great way to have lots of flexibility and movement. You want to have as much free flow of movement as possible while capturing the climber. The last thing you want is to feel limited or restricted by your positioning!

6. Get the look!

The eyes of the climber — that’s what we need to see. What’s going on in their head? The focus and intensity of the climber will be seen in their gaze. Make sure to stay present and look for that look. You’ll know it when you see it.

7. Duct tape for the win

Take it with you and tape sharp edges that the rope is rubbing on. The last thing you want to worry about is having your rope fraying and start cutting due to a sharp edge of the climb.

When you do those practice climbs in advance, make sure you identify where you need to place that tape. Don’t forget to pack it away afterward!

Climbing With a Camera
Photo credit: Alex Eggermont

Climbing With Your Camera: Don’ts

1. Don’t bother with lens caps

Use filters to protect your lenses, but you want to avoid the number of parts you need to deal with when hanging on a rope. Remember, stay light! The less you need to carry around with you, the better. Take only the essentials.

2. Don’t let your rope hang underneath you

Pull it back and clip it to your harness, or make it shorter so it doesn’t hang (don’t forget the knot)! The fewer pieces of gear dangling and flying around you, the better.

Ensure you’re staying compact while you’re hanging and moving around the wall to get different angles. No need for any tangling while you’re in action!


Alex Eggermont has over 10 years of global photography and videography experience. He’s traveled and climbed on multiple continents, and worked as a guide in Iceland. He started teaching photography 3 years ago.

Climb Away offers festivals, day trips, virtual classes, and more to help grow — and get people into — climbing. You can learn more about programs with Climb Away here

cliffhanger julie ellison

Cliffhanger: What a ‘Life in the Vertical’ Is All About

Climber and photographer Julie Ellison explores how a small subset of athletes turned their pastime into a professional sport and worldwide phenomenon.  Read more…

Categories
climbing

Black Diamond on Sale: Save on Mountain & Climbing Equipment

Sport Climbing in the Mountains in Black Diamond Gear
Photo credit: Black Diamond

Black Diamond is having an end-of-season equipment sale to help you save money and send your next route.

This week, you can get up to 25% off all kinds of rock climbing gear, ice climbing gear, ropes, shoeslighting, and more. Below, we’ve highlighted some of the best deals, but be sure to check out the entire sale as well.

Shop the entire Black Diamond sale

Trail Trekking Poles: $75 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Trail Trekking Poles Sale

The trail trekking pole is versatile for any terrain in all four seasons. Black Diamond updated the fusion strap to help provide better handling, more comfort, and added security. While durable, these poles are also pretty sleek, weighing in under 1.5 pounds.

Shop the Trail Trekking PolesSee more trekking poles

Vector Helmet: $68 (20% Off)

Black Diamond Vector Climbing Helmet Sale

According to the brand, the Vector Helmet combines lightweight protection, excellent ventilation, and “barely there” comfort, which makes it suitable for long routes where every ounce counts. We also love this helmet’s adjustment straps and fit.

Shop the Vector HelmetSee more helmets on sale

Liquid Black Gold Chalk: $15 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Liquid Black Gold Chalk

Black Gold liquid chalk is an alternative to regular chalk. According to the brand, it absorbs twice the moisture and, once dry, leaves a grippy layer of chalk so you don’t have to reapply as often. Plus, it contains 70% ethanol, which can help kill germs and viruses.

Shop the Black Gold ChalkSee more chalk deals

Creek 35 Pack: $142 (25% Off)

BD creek pack

Burly, water-resistant materials make the Creek 35 pack a popular option with climbers. It’s one of our editor’s go-to crag packs. In our tests, it was easy to carry, held a lot of gear, and all the pockets and zippers kept us organized.

Shop the Creek 35 PackSee more pack deals

Solution Harness: $60-80 (20% Off)

Black Diamond Solution Rock Climbing Harness Sale

This lightweight harness aims to provide comfort by evenly distributing your weight when hanging as well as reducing pressure on sensitive areas while still maximizing freedom of movement.

Shop the Solution HarnessSee more harness deals

Camalot C4: $58-112 (10% Off)

Black Diamond Rock Climbing C4 Camalots Sale

Black Diamond cams are the gold standard for rock protection. They are invaluable for trad climbing, mixed climbing, and building top rope anchors. We reviewed the new Camalot C4s when they first came out.

These cams are 10% lighter than its predecessor, which is huge weight savings. Beyond that, we love the trigger keeper tech on the larger sizes and that Black Diamond added color to both lobes and the webbing, making them easier to identify on your harness.

Shop the Camalot C4See more cams on sale

Technician Approach Shoes: $101 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Technician approach shoe

In our review, our tester noted, The Black Diamond Technician is a tight-fitting, sticky, and sensitive (yet supportive) approach shoe with an athletic feel. Available in men’s and women’s, it falls on the light side for a trail-oriented shoe, so it works best with sport climbing or lighter trad climbing loads on approaches short of true alpine.”

Shop Men’sShop Women’sSee more approach shoe deals

Man hiking along cliff

Save 50%: Gear Up for Fall With Backcountry’s Labor Day Sale

Backcountry’s Labor Day sale is underway, and we found the best discounted gear from brands like Arc’teryx, Patagonia, Smartwool, and more. Read more…

Categories
climbing

The Weirdest & Widest Trad Gear for Off-Width Climbing

Black Diamond’s impossibly engineered 21-inch Camalot sure was a good April Fool’s joke, but climbers actually use similar-looking pieces of gear for off-widths. These are some of the widest.

It takes an odd sort of person to really enjoy off-widths. This type of climbing requires full-body movement (and sacrifice) in a wider-than-average crack. The gear required to climb these routes is, by design, weird as well.

Back in the ’80s, there were few options to place gear in cracks wider than 4 inches. Climbers used tube chocks, sideways placements of bong pitons, and hexes for placement of Camalots. But for a crack over 4 inches, the only option was to run it out. Wide gear allowed ambitious climbers to push the limit of what was possible.

Honnold’s Monster Cams to Finger Packs: The Best April Fools' Gags of 2020

Honnold’s Monster Cams to Finger Packs: The Best April Fools’ Gags of 2020

Think big! Gear designers have some pretty incredible ideas. Too bad they don’t all become reality. Read more…

Here’s a collection of some of the most formidable trad gear, designed to help conquer this impressive discipline.

Valley Giant #9

ValleyGiant_Mia
The Valley Giant #9; photo credit: Mia Tucholk

Born from the towering walls surrounding Yosemite Valley, the Valley Giant cams provide protection in monstrous off-widths where other gear fails.

In 2001, Thomas Kasper stumbled upon an article about a group of climbers from Korea who created an 8-inch cam for the infamous Hollow Flake pitch. It’s one of the most brutal off-widths on El Capitan’s Salathe Wall, and climbers often run it out without protection. A cam big enough for that crack was unknown.

Motivated by the story, Kasper began making what he dubbed “Valley Giants” in his machine shop. He hadn’t climbed in 17 years. But Kasper said there was only one foolproof way to test the homemade cams in the wild: Throw on a harness, rack up with the Valley Giant, and place it in a really wide crack. The first generation survived the test on Kasper’s off-the-couch climb of the 2,700-foot route Excalibur Wall on El Capitan.

With a usable span from 6 to 9 inches, the $225 Valley Giant #9 became the widest piece of gear on the market at the time of creation. The lobes are an aluminum alloy cut in Swiss-cheese fashion to optimize the strength of 17 kN and weight of 31 ounces. The creation of the Valley Giant led Kasper up Excalibur and six other routes up El Capitan in Yosemite. His gear has allowed other climbers to do the same.

To purchase, contact Kasper at valleygiant@gmail.com for all inquiries.

Big Bro #5

BigBro_3
Photo credit: Alton Richardson

While exploring the rocks of Utah’s Escalante Canyon, Craig Lubben felt inspired to climb the wide roof cracks he found throughout the desert sandstone. Unfortunately, these routes were un-protectable with the gear on the market.

So with a desire to venture into this new terrain, he thought of a solution: expandable tube chocks. Driven by springs, the tube would lock into place upon use. Once weighted, the gear would be cammed into the sides of the crack, securing the device in case of a fall or take.

BigBro_2

He approached the founder of Trango, Malcolm Daily, with the engineering concept, and together they created the Big Bro. The original production runs were sizes 1-4. Soon after, Daily introduced the half-inch and #5.

At the time, Lubben was pioneering a lot of roof cracks, and the half-inch size was designed to be placed at the end of a roof crack, preventing the rope from sucking in the cam and eliminating the possibility of getting your cam or rope stuck.

The #5, meanwhile, became the largest piece of off-width gear available at 11.3-18.4 inches. The gold piece of gear is now the golden ticket for climbers to protect large features on routes.

In Lubben’s memory, the caricature on the Big Bros is a sketch of his daughter, done by artist Jeremy Collins. The Big Bro #5 is available in limited quantities from Trango Climbing Gear. To add your name to the waitlist, click here.

Kong Gipsy 6

The Italian Company Kong is renowned among climbers for its unique approach to the world of climbing. Its innovative gear ranges from twisted carabiners to inventive belay options. And it has no shortage of ideas for off-width gear as well.

The Kong Gipsy 6 doesn’t look or operate like a traditional camming device. Upon pressing a button, two legs extend like a Swiss Army knife, making it easy to use with one hand. The gear is then placed vertically, with two legs on one side of the crack and the central point on the opposite. Like the Big Bro, it can’t be bumped upon placement.

The Kong Gipsy 6 doesn’t look or operate like a traditional camming device. Upon pressing a button, the two legs extend like a Swiss Army knife, making it easy to use with one hand. Climbers then place the gear vertically with two legs on one side of the crack and the central point on the opposite. Like the Big Bro, it can’t be bumped upon placement.

This odd piece of gear weighs only 17.11 ounces yet is rated at a high strength of 15 kN. The Gipsy 6 has the largest span of the trio at 3.62-8.07 inches.

The Kong Gipsy 6 is difficult to find; the best chance for purchase is to contact Kong USA directly here.

Merlin Rock Gear #10

Merlin10

Merlin’s beard, it’s a mega-cam! Weighing 28.9 ounces with a strength rating of 9 kN, the Merlin #10 is currently the largest functional cam in existence.

Unsatisfied by what he saw on the market, creator and mechanical engineer Erick Davidson decided to create a wide piece of gear for both his wife and himself to use on burly off-widths. The goal was simple: maximum range, maximum weight, and an easy-to-use trigger lock.

“The Merlins were never intended to be sold, but a photo was leaked on Supertopo,” Davidson explained. “That created enough demand that I agreed to start making them for other climbers.”

Merlin8_10

He began by making 8-inch cams and later created the gigantic Merlin #10. With a range of 7.3-12.9 inches, this cam is not for the faint of heart. This size is ideal for a climber who likes full-on chimneys but isn’t a fan of runouts.

Davidson noted they were very happy to have the #10 on the route Right North Book in Tuolumne, which has a 100-foot runout with no other pro wide enough for protection. Weighing 29 ounces, the Merlin #10 will set you back $300.

To purchase, contact Davidson at merlinrockgear@gmail.com for all inquiries.

Brig Bro

Before jumping into this one, we’d like to preface it with a big helping of “don’t try this at home, and if you do, it’s at your own risk”!

With that said, this creative piece of protection harkens back to climbing’s early days, where bold explorers built protection through creative means like nuts and bolts and chocks. But again, this is not safe, and we don’t recommend you try it.

BrigBro_2

Deep in the Midwest wilderness of Jackson Falls, Illinois, resides an ungodly route that climbers call the “Off-Width Exam.” The 5.12a off-width route is as burly as it sounds.

Marshall King and Aidan Zuber, two eager young climbers from the area, desperately wanted to lead the route but didn’t have the necessary gear to do so without a terrifying runout. Instead of wallowing around, King followed the example of climbers before him and explained, “We did what we had to do.”

Out of adversity came the Brig Bro, a piece of lumber cut directly for the dimensions of the Off-Width Exam.

BrigBro_1

The Brig Bro operates simply. Constructed from white pine and drilled by hand, the gear doesn’t need a special mechanism to be placed on a route. King and Zuber fitted a sling through the center to clip with a carabiner.

Like the other, more refined products listed here, the Brig Bro was an invention of necessity. And as climbers continue to push their limits, we can look on as the gear they use to protect themselves continues to evolve, bigger, wider, and, often, even a little bit weirder.

Categories
climbing

Climbing With Your Camera: Dos & Don’ts

Climb Away‘s vision is to bring people from all over the world together over the love of climbing. Get the organization’s pro tips on climbing photography here.

Rock walls are vast and full of opportunities for lessons and growth. Climb Away, a Canadian organization that employs a variety of outdoor instructors as guides for retreats, facilitates that. And one of the most important topics they cover is how to get beginners comfortable on the wall.

In this article, Alex Eggermont, a Squamish-based photographer and instructor at Climb Away, helps us break down the basics of climbing photography.

Climbing With a Camera
Photo credit: Alex Eggermont

Climbing With Your Camera: Dos

Climbing with your camera can be a safety hazard for you and those climbing around you, especially with all the gear that goes along with it. Before going outdoors with professional camera equipment, it’s important to know what the best practices are.

Here’s how to ensure staying light, safe, and agile, while getting the shots you’re searching for.

1. Know what you’re shooting

Ideally, you’ve climbed the route, or at least know when and where the hard parts are. To avoid disturbing the climber during these crux moments, go to the crag a few times and practice those moves with your climbing partner. Make sure you can climb it smoothly before taking it on as a photographer.

2. Take only one or two lenses

Ideally, you wouldn’t even have to change lenses on the wall and even have two bodies. You’re already hauling lots with you while you’re climbing, so only take the essential camera equipment. Remember to stay light.

3. Use static ropes

Redirect whenever you can so that you can see your anchor point and avoid sharp edges that could lead to core shots way faster than you think. Static will give you more control while climbing and help you be more intentional with directing your angles.

4. New point of view

Find that viewpoint you haven’t seen before. The beauty of photographing climbers is that there are so many movements you can capture. Take on a fresh, new perspective, something that’s special to the climber and their style. Try to be original and create some unique content!

climbing with your camera climber
Photo credit: Mark Doliner

5. Add some flexibility

Having two ropes attached to different anchors and two GRIGRIs is a great way to have lots of flexibility and movement. You want to have as much free flow of movement as possible while capturing the climber. The last thing you want is to feel limited or restricted by your positioning!

6. Get the look!

The eyes of the climber — that’s what we need to see. What’s going on in their head? The focus and intensity of the climber will be seen in their gaze. Make sure to stay present and look for that look. You’ll know it when you see it.

7. Duct tape for the win

Take it with you and tape sharp edges that the rope is rubbing on. The last thing you want to worry about is having your rope fraying and start cutting due to a sharp edge of the climb.

When you do those practice climbs in advance, make sure you identify where you need to place that tape. Don’t forget to pack it away afterward!

Climbing With a Camera
Photo credit: Alex Eggermont

Climbing With Your Camera: Don’ts

1. Don’t bother with lens caps

Use filters to protect your lenses, but you want to avoid the number of parts you need to deal with when hanging on a rope. Remember, stay light! The less you need to carry around with you, the better. Take only the essentials.

2. Don’t let your rope hang underneath you

Pull it back and clip it to your harness, or make it shorter so it doesn’t hang (don’t forget the knot)! The fewer pieces of gear dangling and flying around you, the better.

Ensure you’re staying compact while you’re hanging and moving around the wall to get different angles. No need for any tangling while you’re in action!


Alex Eggermont has over 10 years of global photography and videography experience. He’s traveled and climbed on multiple continents, and worked as a guide in Iceland. He started teaching photography 3 years ago.

Climb Away offers festivals, day trips, virtual classes, and more to help grow — and get people into — climbing. You can learn more about programs with Climb Away here

cliffhanger julie ellison

Cliffhanger: What a ‘Life in the Vertical’ Is All About

Climber and photographer Julie Ellison explores how a small subset of athletes turned their pastime into a professional sport and worldwide phenomenon.  Read more…

Categories
climbing

Black Diamond on Sale: Save on Mountain & Climbing Equipment

Sport Climbing in the Mountains in Black Diamond Gear
Photo credit: Black Diamond

Black Diamond is having an end-of-season equipment sale to help you save money and send your next route.

This week, you can get up to 25% off all kinds of rock climbing gear, ice climbing gear, ropes, shoeslighting, and more. Below, we’ve highlighted some of the best deals, but be sure to check out the entire sale as well.

Shop the entire Black Diamond sale

Trail Trekking Poles: $75 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Trail Trekking Poles Sale

The trail trekking pole is versatile for any terrain in all four seasons. Black Diamond updated the fusion strap to help provide better handling, more comfort, and added security. While durable, these poles are also pretty sleek, weighing in under 1.5 pounds.

Shop the Trail Trekking PolesSee more trekking poles

Vector Helmet: $68 (20% Off)

Black Diamond Vector Climbing Helmet Sale

According to the brand, the Vector Helmet combines lightweight protection, excellent ventilation, and “barely there” comfort, which makes it suitable for long routes where every ounce counts. We also love this helmet’s adjustment straps and fit.

Shop the Vector HelmetSee more helmets on sale

Liquid Black Gold Chalk: $15 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Liquid Black Gold Chalk

Black Gold liquid chalk is an alternative to regular chalk. According to the brand, it absorbs twice the moisture and, once dry, leaves a grippy layer of chalk so you don’t have to reapply as often. Plus, it contains 70% ethanol, which can help kill germs and viruses.

Shop the Black Gold ChalkSee more chalk deals

Creek 35 Pack: $142 (25% Off)

BD creek pack

Burly, water-resistant materials make the Creek 35 pack a popular option with climbers. It’s one of our editor’s go-to crag packs. In our tests, it was easy to carry, held a lot of gear, and all the pockets and zippers kept us organized.

Shop the Creek 35 PackSee more pack deals

Solution Harness: $60-80 (20% Off)

Black Diamond Solution Rock Climbing Harness Sale

This lightweight harness aims to provide comfort by evenly distributing your weight when hanging as well as reducing pressure on sensitive areas while still maximizing freedom of movement.

Shop the Solution HarnessSee more harness deals

Camalot C4: $58-112 (10% Off)

Black Diamond Rock Climbing C4 Camalots Sale

Black Diamond cams are the gold standard for rock protection. They are invaluable for trad climbing, mixed climbing, and building top rope anchors. We reviewed the new Camalot C4s when they first came out.

These cams are 10% lighter than its predecessor, which is huge weight savings. Beyond that, we love the trigger keeper tech on the larger sizes and that Black Diamond added color to both lobes and the webbing, making them easier to identify on your harness.

Shop the Camalot C4See more cams on sale

Technician Approach Shoes: $101 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Technician approach shoe

In our review, our tester noted, The Black Diamond Technician is a tight-fitting, sticky, and sensitive (yet supportive) approach shoe with an athletic feel. Available in men’s and women’s, it falls on the light side for a trail-oriented shoe, so it works best with sport climbing or lighter trad climbing loads on approaches short of true alpine.”

Shop Men’sShop Women’sSee more approach shoe deals

Man hiking along cliff

Save 50%: Gear Up for Fall With Backcountry’s Labor Day Sale

Backcountry’s Labor Day sale is underway, and we found the best discounted gear from brands like Arc’teryx, Patagonia, Smartwool, and more. Read more…

Categories
gripped

Behind the Shot: Matt Bolton’s Wild Line Past a Rock Climber

Squamish is famous around the world for its massive granite slabs. First in climbing, then in mountain biking, the slabs of Squamish are featured in countless magazine spreads and videos. Matt Bolton combines both into one photo, which is quickly making the rounds online in mountain biking and climbing circles.

In the photo, captured by Clint Trahan and Travis Bothner, Bolton descends a near-vertical rock face, travelling parallel to a climber going in the opposite direction.

Bolton is no stranger to Squamish’s slabs, he has a hand in setting some of the hardest lines in the Sea to Sky and riding many more. Sharing a route with a rock climber is different. The line, which he’s named Finger Biter, is an escalation of difficulty, and an impressive feat.

“I’m always trying to push my limits with trail building and riding,” says the Squamish-based freerider. “I’ve done similar steepness slabs in the past but this one had almost no run in and a tree right beside the run out. I pretty much had to get on my bike at the top and track stand before going over the edge.”

In the sequence, Bolton’s rear wheel is clearly off the ground for most of the slab’s top half. While nose-manualling a near-vertical rock face, where most would be worried about surviving on two wheels, seems crazy, a difficult entry to the feature made the added flair necessary.

“The entrance to this slab was a 90° edge,” Bolton explained. “I was worried about scraping my bottom bracket so once my front wheel was over I lifted the back wheel and nose pressed the slab.”

Scouting and setting up the shot

While the riding is impressive, it’s only part of the story. Getting the shot took planning and a bit of luck.

“I’d been looking for a slab I could ride down at the same time as a rock climber ascending for a while,” says Bolton. The final find came on foot. “I stumbled across this one while hiking and I saw it was already bolted, so I knew it was perfect.”

To complete the shot, the Squamish freerider called in a few friends. Clint Trahan, a pro photographer who spent most of his August travelling with the Crankworx Summer Series, and Travis Bothner – the founder of one of Bolton’s sponsors, NF joined behind the lens. Bolton still needed someone to join him in frame, though.

“I told my climbing buddy Adam what I wanted to do and he was super stoked on the idea.”

Finger Biter: by the numbers

Bolton cleaned his route, scraping away some moss for his own entry to parallel the climber’s ascent. For those into numbers, the crag has several bolted routes, ranging from 5.9 to 5.11c in difficulty.

For those not familiar with climbing, Bolton says “The bottom of the rock, closest to the transition, was 69-degrees (I can’t make that up!) but the top and middle are closer to vertical.”

Written by Terry McKall for Canadian Mountainbiking, one of Gripped Publishing’s many media.

Categories
gripped

Five Best Liquid Chalks for Canadians

Climbing gyms are open, but with COVID regulations in place, the gym is not what it used to be. In some ways this is nice. Quiet sessions may allow for a more meditative climbing experience and fewer queues between routes. However, one point of consternation has been the elimination of loose chalk and the inclusion of liquid chalks.

What should you buy?

Mammut Liquid Chalk:

If you have ever seen a competition climber rubbing liquid chalk into their hands, there is a good chance that it was Mammut. This stuff is easily one of the best liquid chalks on the market. What makes it so ideal is the shear alcohol concentration. The drying effect is substantial and can allow for some seriously radical burns on route. The tube comes in both 100ml and 200ml versions. Though Liquid Chalk is certainly more expensive than regular loose chalk, you do not have to use as much of it if you are tactical with your application. Try rubbing in a base coat at the beginning of your session to remove the excess oils from your skin. Though all liquid chalks are meant to be used with loose chalk, this one climbs well regardless. You can get the 200ml tube for $10.63 from Alpin Store.

Friction Labs – Hygienic Secret Stuff:

The Secret Stuff from Friction Labs pursues a slightly different direction than Mammut. Instead of an aqueous solution, the Friction Labs product is more of a cream and excels on low friction holds. It dries on thicker than Mammut’s liquid chalk, but sticks to the skin much longer. At 80% alcohol concentration, it is the world’s first Hygienic Chalk.

If you are climbing in a gym with high-friction holds, you may not notice a difference in its durability compared to Mammut, but if you are climbing on classic polyurethane, it should stick around a bit longer.The drawback with this chalk is the cost. Friction Labs’ high quality comes at a price. At $19 USD for 75ml, you are spending a lot if you are using this chalk. Of course the increased durability might make it worth it. If you climb primarily on a board, like a MoonBoard or spray wall, this might be the perfect chalk for you.

Friction Labs – Alcohol-free Secret Stuff:

If you already have dry skin, the above options may not seem very attractive to you. Mammut Liquid Chalk is made of over 75% alcohol while the Secret Stuff from Friction Labs brings with it around 45% isopropyl alcohol. Either concentration can be a lot for someone with easily irritated skin or particularly dry skin. As such, it might be worth trying the alcohol-free Secret Stuff. It still comes complete with a high density of Magnesium to increase your grip, and keep your hands dry. With that said, if you have sweaty palms, this will not dry your hands as well as the alcohol-based version. It is also $19 USD for 75ml.

Tokyo Powder Industries – Boost:

If you are looking to try something a little out of the ordinary, look no further than Tokyo Powder Industries Boost. Perhaps one of the most underrated condensed-chalk products, Boost is granular, high concentrate chalk that feels like glue when it is applied to clean skin. For $25.50 USD, you can get two packets of this chalk type from So iLL, their distributing partner. It is a unique chalk that should theoretically last a long time by virtue of the fact that one or two pebbles are enough for an application.

That said, it is pretty addictive and you may find yourself using more than the prescribed amount. The drawbacks with this chalk are that it takes a second to get used to and it comes on to the skin like a wax. For some people it may feel worse than regular liquid chalk. It benefits greatly from an additional layer of loose chalk over-top its base layer. That said, on low texture holds it is much like glue.

Tembo Liquid Chalk: Climber’s Bulk Bottle

Looking to buy Canadian? If you are willing to drop $69.99 up front, Tembo will send you 1000ml of liquid chalk in addition to two free 50ml, refillable dispensers. For those that are sure to burn through large amounts of liquid chalk, this is easily the best value for your money. If, however, that $70 price tag is too steep, you can get a 500ml bulk bottle for a more affordable $44.99. This package comes complete with one 50ml refillable dispenser. With an alcohol content of 70%, this liquid chalk will dry your hands, while the fine grain of tembo chalk will ensure solid sweat absorption.If your facility is currently liquid chalk exclusive, this product is highly recommended. 

 

 

 

Categories
climbing

The Weirdest & Widest Trad Gear for Off-Width Climbing

Black Diamond’s impossibly engineered 21-inch Camalot sure was a good April Fool’s joke, but climbers actually use similar-looking pieces of gear for off-widths. These are some of the widest.

It takes an odd sort of person to really enjoy off-widths. This type of climbing requires full-body movement (and sacrifice) in a wider-than-average crack. The gear required to climb these routes is, by design, weird as well.

Back in the ’80s, there were few options to place gear in cracks wider than 4 inches. Climbers used tube chocks, sideways placements of bong pitons, and hexes for placement of Camalots. But for a crack over 4 inches, the only option was to run it out. Wide gear allowed ambitious climbers to push the limit of what was possible.

Honnold’s Monster Cams to Finger Packs: The Best April Fools' Gags of 2020

Honnold’s Monster Cams to Finger Packs: The Best April Fools’ Gags of 2020

Think big! Gear designers have some pretty incredible ideas. Too bad they don’t all become reality. Read more…

Here’s a collection of some of the most formidable trad gear, designed to help conquer this impressive discipline.

Valley Giant #9

ValleyGiant_Mia
The Valley Giant #9; photo credit: Mia Tucholk

Born from the towering walls surrounding Yosemite Valley, the Valley Giant cams provide protection in monstrous off-widths where other gear fails.

In 2001, Thomas Kasper stumbled upon an article about a group of climbers from Korea who created an 8-inch cam for the infamous Hollow Flake pitch. It’s one of the most brutal off-widths on El Capitan’s Salathe Wall, and climbers often run it out without protection. A cam big enough for that crack was unknown.

Motivated by the story, Kasper began making what he dubbed “Valley Giants” in his machine shop. He hadn’t climbed in 17 years. But Kasper said there was only one foolproof way to test the homemade cams in the wild: Throw on a harness, rack up with the Valley Giant, and place it in a really wide crack. The first generation survived the test on Kasper’s off-the-couch climb of the 2,700-foot route Excalibur Wall on El Capitan.

With a usable span from 6 to 9 inches, the $225 Valley Giant #9 became the widest piece of gear on the market at the time of creation. The lobes are an aluminum alloy cut in Swiss-cheese fashion to optimize the strength of 17 kN and weight of 31 ounces. The creation of the Valley Giant led Kasper up Excalibur and six other routes up El Capitan in Yosemite. His gear has allowed other climbers to do the same.

To purchase, contact Kasper at valleygiant@gmail.com for all inquiries.

Big Bro #5

BigBro_3
Photo credit: Alton Richardson

While exploring the rocks of Utah’s Escalante Canyon, Craig Lubben felt inspired to climb the wide roof cracks he found throughout the desert sandstone. Unfortunately, these routes were un-protectable with the gear on the market.

So with a desire to venture into this new terrain, he thought of a solution: expandable tube chocks. Driven by springs, the tube would lock into place upon use. Once weighted, the gear would be cammed into the sides of the crack, securing the device in case of a fall or take.

BigBro_2

He approached the founder of Trango, Malcolm Daily, with the engineering concept, and together they created the Big Bro. The original production runs were sizes 1-4. Soon after, Daily introduced the half-inch and #5.

At the time, Lubben was pioneering a lot of roof cracks, and the half-inch size was designed to be placed at the end of a roof crack, preventing the rope from sucking in the cam and eliminating the possibility of getting your cam or rope stuck.

The #5, meanwhile, became the largest piece of off-width gear available at 11.3-18.4 inches. The gold piece of gear is now the golden ticket for climbers to protect large features on routes.

In Lubben’s memory, the caricature on the Big Bros is a sketch of his daughter, done by artist Jeremy Collins. The Big Bro #5 is available in limited quantities from Trango Climbing Gear. To add your name to the waitlist, click here.

Kong Gipsy 6

The Italian Company Kong is renowned among climbers for its unique approach to the world of climbing. Its innovative gear ranges from twisted carabiners to inventive belay options. And it has no shortage of ideas for off-width gear as well.

The Kong Gipsy 6 doesn’t look or operate like a traditional camming device. Upon pressing a button, two legs extend like a Swiss Army knife, making it easy to use with one hand. The gear is then placed vertically, with two legs on one side of the crack and the central point on the opposite. Like the Big Bro, it can’t be bumped upon placement.

The Kong Gipsy 6 doesn’t look or operate like a traditional camming device. Upon pressing a button, the two legs extend like a Swiss Army knife, making it easy to use with one hand. Climbers then place the gear vertically with two legs on one side of the crack and the central point on the opposite. Like the Big Bro, it can’t be bumped upon placement.

This odd piece of gear weighs only 17.11 ounces yet is rated at a high strength of 15 kN. The Gipsy 6 has the largest span of the trio at 3.62-8.07 inches.

The Kong Gipsy 6 is difficult to find; the best chance for purchase is to contact Kong USA directly here.

Merlin Rock Gear #10

Merlin10

Merlin’s beard, it’s a mega-cam! Weighing 28.9 ounces with a strength rating of 9 kN, the Merlin #10 is currently the largest functional cam in existence.

Unsatisfied by what he saw on the market, creator and mechanical engineer Erick Davidson decided to create a wide piece of gear for both his wife and himself to use on burly off-widths. The goal was simple: maximum range, maximum weight, and an easy-to-use trigger lock.

“The Merlins were never intended to be sold, but a photo was leaked on Supertopo,” Davidson explained. “That created enough demand that I agreed to start making them for other climbers.”

Merlin8_10

He began by making 8-inch cams and later created the gigantic Merlin #10. With a range of 7.3-12.9 inches, this cam is not for the faint of heart. This size is ideal for a climber who likes full-on chimneys but isn’t a fan of runouts.

Davidson noted they were very happy to have the #10 on the route Right North Book in Tuolumne, which has a 100-foot runout with no other pro wide enough for protection. Weighing 29 ounces, the Merlin #10 will set you back $300.

To purchase, contact Davidson at merlinrockgear@gmail.com for all inquiries.

Brig Bro

Before jumping into this one, we’d like to preface it with a big helping of “don’t try this at home, and if you do, it’s at your own risk”!

With that said, this creative piece of protection harkens back to climbing’s early days, where bold explorers built protection through creative means like nuts and bolts and chocks. But again, this is not safe, and we don’t recommend you try it.

BrigBro_2

Deep in the Midwest wilderness of Jackson Falls, Illinois, resides an ungodly route that climbers call the “Off-Width Exam.” The 5.12a off-width route is as burly as it sounds.

Marshall King and Aidan Zuber, two eager young climbers from the area, desperately wanted to lead the route but didn’t have the necessary gear to do so without a terrifying runout. Instead of wallowing around, King followed the example of climbers before him and explained, “We did what we had to do.”

Out of adversity came the Brig Bro, a piece of lumber cut directly for the dimensions of the Off-Width Exam.

BrigBro_1

The Brig Bro operates simply. Constructed from white pine and drilled by hand, the gear doesn’t need a special mechanism to be placed on a route. King and Zuber fitted a sling through the center to clip with a carabiner.

Like the other, more refined products listed here, the Brig Bro was an invention of necessity. And as climbers continue to push their limits, we can look on as the gear they use to protect themselves continues to evolve, bigger, wider, and, often, even a little bit weirder.

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Climbing With Your Camera: Dos & Don’ts

Climb Away‘s vision is to bring people from all over the world together over the love of climbing. Get the organization’s pro tips on climbing photography here.

Rock walls are vast and full of opportunities for lessons and growth. Climb Away, a Canadian organization that employs a variety of outdoor instructors as guides for retreats, facilitates that. And one of the most important topics they cover is how to get beginners comfortable on the wall.

In this article, Alex Eggermont, a Squamish-based photographer and instructor at Climb Away, helps us break down the basics of climbing photography.

Climbing With a Camera
Photo credit: Alex Eggermont

Climbing With Your Camera: Dos

Climbing with your camera can be a safety hazard for you and those climbing around you, especially with all the gear that goes along with it. Before going outdoors with professional camera equipment, it’s important to know what the best practices are.

Here’s how to ensure staying light, safe, and agile, while getting the shots you’re searching for.

1. Know what you’re shooting

Ideally, you’ve climbed the route, or at least know when and where the hard parts are. To avoid disturbing the climber during these crux moments, go to the crag a few times and practice those moves with your climbing partner. Make sure you can climb it smoothly before taking it on as a photographer.

2. Take only one or two lenses

Ideally, you wouldn’t even have to change lenses on the wall and even have two bodies. You’re already hauling lots with you while you’re climbing, so only take the essential camera equipment. Remember to stay light.

3. Use static ropes

Redirect whenever you can so that you can see your anchor point and avoid sharp edges that could lead to core shots way faster than you think. Static will give you more control while climbing and help you be more intentional with directing your angles.

4. New point of view

Find that viewpoint you haven’t seen before. The beauty of photographing climbers is that there are so many movements you can capture. Take on a fresh, new perspective, something that’s special to the climber and their style. Try to be original and create some unique content!

climbing with your camera climber
Photo credit: Mark Doliner

5. Add some flexibility

Having two ropes attached to different anchors and two GRIGRIs is a great way to have lots of flexibility and movement. You want to have as much free flow of movement as possible while capturing the climber. The last thing you want is to feel limited or restricted by your positioning!

6. Get the look!

The eyes of the climber — that’s what we need to see. What’s going on in their head? The focus and intensity of the climber will be seen in their gaze. Make sure to stay present and look for that look. You’ll know it when you see it.

7. Duct tape for the win

Take it with you and tape sharp edges that the rope is rubbing on. The last thing you want to worry about is having your rope fraying and start cutting due to a sharp edge of the climb.

When you do those practice climbs in advance, make sure you identify where you need to place that tape. Don’t forget to pack it away afterward!

Climbing With a Camera
Photo credit: Alex Eggermont

Climbing With Your Camera: Don’ts

1. Don’t bother with lens caps

Use filters to protect your lenses, but you want to avoid the number of parts you need to deal with when hanging on a rope. Remember, stay light! The less you need to carry around with you, the better. Take only the essentials.

2. Don’t let your rope hang underneath you

Pull it back and clip it to your harness, or make it shorter so it doesn’t hang (don’t forget the knot)! The fewer pieces of gear dangling and flying around you, the better.

Ensure you’re staying compact while you’re hanging and moving around the wall to get different angles. No need for any tangling while you’re in action!


Alex Eggermont has over 10 years of global photography and videography experience. He’s traveled and climbed on multiple continents, and worked as a guide in Iceland. He started teaching photography 3 years ago.

Climb Away offers festivals, day trips, virtual classes, and more to help grow — and get people into — climbing. You can learn more about programs with Climb Away here

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climbing

Black Diamond on Sale: Save on Mountain & Climbing Equipment

Sport Climbing in the Mountains in Black Diamond Gear
Photo credit: Black Diamond

Black Diamond is having an end-of-season equipment sale to help you save money and send your next route.

This week, you can get up to 25% off all kinds of rock climbing gear, ice climbing gear, ropes, shoeslighting, and more. Below, we’ve highlighted some of the best deals, but be sure to check out the entire sale as well.

Shop the entire Black Diamond sale

Trail Trekking Poles: $75 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Trail Trekking Poles Sale

The trail trekking pole is versatile for any terrain in all four seasons. Black Diamond updated the fusion strap to help provide better handling, more comfort, and added security. While durable, these poles are also pretty sleek, weighing in under 1.5 pounds.

Shop the Trail Trekking PolesSee more trekking poles

Vector Helmet: $68 (20% Off)

Black Diamond Vector Climbing Helmet Sale

According to the brand, the Vector Helmet combines lightweight protection, excellent ventilation, and “barely there” comfort, which makes it suitable for long routes where every ounce counts. We also love this helmet’s adjustment straps and fit.

Shop the Vector HelmetSee more helmets on sale

Liquid Black Gold Chalk: $15 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Liquid Black Gold Chalk

Black Gold liquid chalk is an alternative to regular chalk. According to the brand, it absorbs twice the moisture and, once dry, leaves a grippy layer of chalk so you don’t have to reapply as often. Plus, it contains 70% ethanol, which can help kill germs and viruses.

Shop the Black Gold ChalkSee more chalk deals

Creek 35 Pack: $142 (25% Off)

BD creek pack

Burly, water-resistant materials make the Creek 35 pack a popular option with climbers. It’s one of our editor’s go-to crag packs. In our tests, it was easy to carry, held a lot of gear, and all the pockets and zippers kept us organized.

Shop the Creek 35 PackSee more pack deals

Solution Harness: $60-80 (20% Off)

Black Diamond Solution Rock Climbing Harness Sale

This lightweight harness aims to provide comfort by evenly distributing your weight when hanging as well as reducing pressure on sensitive areas while still maximizing freedom of movement.

Shop the Solution HarnessSee more harness deals

Camalot C4: $58-112 (10% Off)

Black Diamond Rock Climbing C4 Camalots Sale

Black Diamond cams are the gold standard for rock protection. They are invaluable for trad climbing, mixed climbing, and building top rope anchors. We reviewed the new Camalot C4s when they first came out.

These cams are 10% lighter than its predecessor, which is huge weight savings. Beyond that, we love the trigger keeper tech on the larger sizes and that Black Diamond added color to both lobes and the webbing, making them easier to identify on your harness.

Shop the Camalot C4See more cams on sale

Technician Approach Shoes: $101 (25% Off)

Black Diamond Technician approach shoe

In our review, our tester noted, The Black Diamond Technician is a tight-fitting, sticky, and sensitive (yet supportive) approach shoe with an athletic feel. Available in men’s and women’s, it falls on the light side for a trail-oriented shoe, so it works best with sport climbing or lighter trad climbing loads on approaches short of true alpine.”

Shop Men’sShop Women’sSee more approach shoe deals

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